What is Probation

Probation in criminal law refers to a period of supervised incarceration, usually ordered by the judge, rather than serving time at the prison. Probation can vary from a one-year jail sentence to a year, two years, or sometimes even more. Probation can be ordered for various reasons, such as when the defendant is facing a second or third felony conviction. Probation can also be ordered to prevent a repeat offense from happening, or to protect a victim or defendant from repeat crime. Probation can be used to satisfy the requirements of a suspended sentence or it can be used to satisfy the conditions of an extended stay or house arrest. A probation sentence may even serve as a chance to clean up a record, which may result in an expungement of the original crime.

Probation Can Affect Your Life

Probation can affect a defendant’s daily life, both mentally and physically. Probation terms generally include restrictions on travel, employment, housing, education, and use of credit. Probation can cause the release from confinement of an offender, depending on the extent of their probation sentence and any other applicable laws. The length of time that an offender can live in confinement, however, can vary according to the type of confinement that is imposed. Prison stays are generally shorter than those that can be placed in jail.

Don’t Violate Probation

If a defendant violates probation, the judge will hold the defendant in jail until the sentence is completed. In some states, probation sentences are not considered “time served” at all. A defendant cannot be found guilty and convicted of a crime unless he or she has been convicted of a crime. This means that a defendant who is arrested but is not charged with a crime does not have to go to jail to serve time in prison. It can also mean that a defendant cannot be found guilty of a crime and convicted of a crime unless he or she has been convicted of a crime. This means that a defendant who is arrested but is not charged with a crime does not have to go to jail to serve time in prison.